Earthquakes

Magnitude 5+ Earthquakes – Global

7.0 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

Chilean authorities said more than 100,000 people briefly evacuated some coastal areas as a precaution. Only minor damage was reported.

Chile is one of the world’s most earthquake-prone countries. A magnitude-8.8 quake and the tsunami it unleashed in 2010 killed more than 500 people, destroyed 220,000 homes, and washed away docks, river fronts and seaside resorts.

The strongest earthquake ever recorded also happened in Chile, a magnitude-9.5 tremor in 1960 that killed more than 5,000 people.

6.2 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.5 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.1 Earthquake hits Mindanao in the philippines.

5.1 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.1 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.0 Earthquake hits southwest of Sumatra, Indonesia.

5.0 Earthquake hits the Ceram Sea, Indonesia.

5.0 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.0 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

5.0 Earthquake hits offshore Tarapaca, Chile.

Storms and Floods

Tropical Storms

No current tropical storms.

The remnants of what had been tropical cyclone Lusi were due to strike the Wellington region of New Zealand overnight, but the capital emerged relatively unscathed.

NewsBytes:

Torrential rains in South Africa have led to 32 deaths, 25 of which were drownings over the past two weeks.

Global Warming

Vanishing ice warning for ‘Mountains of the Moon’

At 5 109 metres, Mount Stanley’s jagged peak is the third highest mountain in Africa, topped only by Mount Kenya and Tanzania’s iconic Kilimanjaro.

Ice on the Rwenzori mountain range is melting at “disturbing” rates, and within two decades Africa’s equatorial peaks will be bare rock.

Ancient Greek geographer Ptolemy in Alexandria wrote of the snow-capped Rwenzoris around the second century AD, dubbing the mysterious peaks the “Mountains of the Moon”, and identifying them as a source of the mighty White Nile.

But after centuries of wonder at the spectacle of snow on the equator, the ice is vanishing, bringing with it multiple challenges.

“The melting glaciers are another warning sign, a ‘canary in the mine’ of mankind’s inability to contain climate change and its negative consequences,” said Luc Hardy of Pax Arctica, an organisation that promotes awareness of the impact of climate change, and who led an expedition in January to the mountains.

“The melting of this unique African glacier is a major threat to local communities, with the obvious loss of sustainable water supplies.”

Reduced glacial river flows are already affecting agricultural production and cutting the output of hydroelectric power plants, said Richard Atugonza, from the Mountain Resource Centre at Uganda’s Makere University.

British-American explorer Henry Morton Stanley was the first Westerner to sight the ice in 1889, but the dramatic sight of glinting snow in hot sunshine is fading fast, with maps showing the ice has shrunk from some seven square kilometres when they were first climbed in 1906, to just a single square kilometre today.

Fifty years ago, the glacier once began a stone’s throw from the cliff-top Elena camp, where mountaineers shiver in basic huts before making a pre-dawn attempt to scale Stanley’s peaks.

Now the ice lies almost an hour’s tough scramble up a steep track on loose rocks along sheer cliffs.

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Volcanos

Roundup of Global Volcanic Activity:

El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain): What looks like a new swarm of earthquakes accompanied by strong harmonic tremor appeared on the southernmost seismic station at La Restinga. If it is not due to some local, human-induced work or malfunction, it suggests that the quakes are very shallow, since they don’t appear on the signals of other stations. Whatever is happening there will probably become clearer soon. The latest earthquake swarm in the NE part of the island had more or less stopped during the past 24 hours. Some GPS stations showed 2-4 cm uplift during the weekend, which supports the idea of a new deep magma intrusion.