Earthquakes

Magnitude 5+ Earthquakes – Global

6.5 Earthquake hits the Aukland Islands, New Zealand.

5.3 Earthquake hits southeast of Easter island.

5.3 Earthquake hits northern Sumatra, Indonesia.

5.2 Earthquake hits Kyushu, Japan.

5.2 Earthquake hits Ascension Island.

Storms and Floods

Tropical Storms – Roundup of Tropical Storms:

In the Eastern Pacific: Tropical Storm Eugene is located about 545 mi…880 km SSW of Punta Eugenia Mexico with maximum sustained winds…65 mph…100 km/h. Present movement…NW or 325 degrees at 9 mph…15 km/h.

Gl sst mm

Environment

Sixth mass extinction

Many scientists say it’s abundantly clear that Earth is entering its sixth mass-extinction event, meaning three-quarters of all species could disappear in the coming centuries.

But that’s not even the full picture of the “biological annihilation” people are inflicting on the natural world, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Gerardo Ceballos, an ecology professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and his co-authors, including well-known Stanford University biologist Paul Ehrlich, cite striking new evidence that populations of species we thought were common are suffering in unseen ways.

Their key findings: Nearly one-third of the 27,600 land-based mammal, bird, amphibian and reptile species studied are shrinking in terms of their numbers and territorial range. The researchers called that an “extremely high degree of population decay.”

The scientists also looked at a well-studied group of 177 mammal species and found that all of them had lost at least 30% of their territory between 1900 and 2015; more than 40% of those species “experienced severe population declines,” meaning they lost at least 80% of their geographic range during that time.

Looking at the extinction crisis not only in terms of species that are on the brink but also those whose populations and ranges are shrinking helps show that “Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe” than previously thought, the authors write. They say a major extinction event is “ongoing.”

Wildlife

Wildlife at Risk After Monsoon Floods in India

Police are patrolling for poachers as rhinoceros, deer and wild buffalo move to higher ground to escape floods devastating parts of northeast India, including a famed wildlife preserve.

Kaziranga National Park in Assam state has the world’s largest population of the one-horned rhinoceros and is home to many other species.

The flooding situation in the park is grave after heavy monsoon rains in the past three weeks. Forest guards have found one carcass of a rhino that died in the floods, and vehicles on a highway knocked down six deer over the weekend.

Most forest guard posts in the park have flooded, and police are ordering drones to keep watch on the national park spread over an area of 500 square kilometers (195 square miles).

Disease

Burundi: Malaria outbreak continues

In a follow-up on the malaria outbreak in the east African country of Burundi, 4,376,804 cases including 1,996 deaths (case fatality rate 0.05%) have been reported this year through the end of June. It’s been increasing persistently despite ongoing response interventions. During the most recent weekly data available (ending June 25), 173,355 clinical cases of malaria including 102 deaths were reported.

Yemen – Cholera Epidemic Update

The deadly cholera outbreak that has plagued Yemen since last year reached a grim milestone on Sunday as the number of suspected cases surpassed more than 300,000.

More than 1,700 people in the war-torn country have died of cholera in the past months, the International Committee of the Red Cross announced on Monday, and 300,000 people are suspected to be ill. The epidemic is now growing at the staggering rate of 7,000 new cases per day, said Robert Mardini, the Red Cross regional director for the Middle East. The capital of Sanaa and the regions of Hodeida, Hajjah and Amran are among the hardest hit.