Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 112 degrees Fahrenheit (44.4 degrees Celsius) in Rivadavia, Argentina.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 62.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 52.2 degrees Celsius) at Oimyakon, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Record Pressure

London experienced what was likely the U.K. capital’s highest barometric pressure since records began in 1692 as a massive area of high pressure blanketed the United Kingdom and much of northern Europe.

Instruments at London’s Heathrow Airport recorded a pressure of 1,049.6 millibars (30.99 inches of mercury) on Jan. 19. The all-time British record of 1,053.6 millibars (31.11 inches of mercury) was set in Aberdeen, Scotland, on Jan. 31, 1902.

The development of such a powerful high pressure system helped spawn Spain’s worst winter storm in decades to the south.

A deep low pressure area, dubbed storm Gloria, killed at least 11 people and caused widespread destruction and heavy snowfall across the Iberian Peninsula.

Space Events

Oldest Crater

When we gaze out into our solar system and observe its several planets and many moons, one thing tends to be true of just about all of them: They have lots and lots of impact craters. Each of those scars on a planet or moon’s surface tells a story, and while Earth’s weather and plentiful water ensure that most impact craters are erased or obscured from view, there are still a number of them that researchers have been able to sniff out.

As NASA reveals in a new post on its website, the previous record holder for the oldest crater on Earth has been bested by a new discovery in Australia. Called the Yarrabubba meteor crater, it’s estimated to be a whopping 2.229 billion years old.

Img 1447 e1579714147175

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 116 degrees Fahrenheit (46.7 degrees Celsius) in Augrabies Falls, South Africa.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 64.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53.3 degrees Celsius) at Delyankir, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius) in Penrith, New South Wales.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 61.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 51.7 degrees Celsius) at Thomsen River, North West Territory.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 125 degrees Fahrenheit (51.7 degrees Celsius) in Death Valley, California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 116.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 82.2 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 118 degrees Fahrenheit (47.8 degrees Celsius) in Birdsville, Queensland.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 62.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 52.2 degrees Celsius) at Verkhoyansk, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Boulia, Queensland.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 64.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53.3 degrees Celsius) at Verkhoyansk, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 115.0 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Birdsville, Queensland.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 59.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 50.5 degrees Celsius) at Verkhoyansk, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Geminid Meteor Shower

Sky watchers can enjoy the Geminids Meteor Shower until 15 December. With the moon being full, it is however not the best year for one of the best meteor showers. The best time to watch will be 13 and 14 December.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 113 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Mardie, Western Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 60.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 48.3 degrees Celsius) at Dzardzan, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Some Wildlife Photography Award Finalists

A hunting Pallas’ cat in the Mongolian grasslands.

Uploads 2Fcard 2Fimage 2F1102290 2Fa980bbba cf91 4985 a719 fa05242f4e80 jpg 2Ffull fit in 950x534

A mother polar bear and her cubs in Wapusk National Park, Manitoba,

Uploads 2Fcard 2Fimage 2F1102289 2Fdd847f9c 4f80 4a33 a57e 08afb526228a jpg 2Ffull fit in 950x534

A humpback whale feeding off the coast of Great Bear Rainforest, British Columbia, Canada

Uploads 2Fcard 2Fimage 2F1102274 2F4f5710ae 41d4 4293 8feb 236631ab3e8e jpg 2Ffull fit in 950x534

Some well-disguised reindeer in Svalbard, Norway.

Uploads 2Fcard 2Fimage 2F1102263 2Fd59febd4 5e68 4f62 b7c5 8f73650e9a52 jpg 2Ffull fit in 950x534

An orangutan being forced to box in a show in Safari World, Bangkok.

Uploads 2Fcard 2Fimage 2F1102309 2F2c973062 f946 46fb 9f4b 16ce94c0b399 jpg 2Ffull fit in 950x534

Environment

Record Temperature in South Africa

Vioolsdrif, a village in the Northern Cape, has broken a new record for the highest temperature in the country — reaching over 50 degrees Celsius. On Thursday, it reached a new record of 50.1°C and then it broke its own record again on Friday by reaching 53.2°C.

There was an upper high weather system situated over the area that resulted in an increase of temperatures, which is the reason we had a heatwave condition in parts of SA. Planet Earth and Storm Report SA reported that the temperature recorded at the Viooldrif weather station is now the highest yet recorded anywhere in Africa in the modern era.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 116 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 65.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 48.3 degrees Celsius) at Verkhoyansk, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

New Interstellar Visitor

An interstellar object from deep in space has been spotted hurtling towards our solar system. Known as 21/Borisov experts say that the object is only the second interstellar object spotted in our solar system. The first close up of the object was captured in August by experts at the Keck observatory in Hawaii. Borisov is now set to make its close approach next month passing roughly 190 million miles away from our orbit, about twice the distance from Earth to the Sun.

The object itself has a long tail made up of ice and debris stretching a whopping 100,000 miles behind it. With the tale included this makes the Borisov vastly huge staggeringly longer than 12 earths.

Despite the extensive study and focus given to the interstellar object scientists still remain clueless as to what Borisov actually is. At the moment many scientists best guess is that it is a comet, with the hope being that studying it will open the door to answers on how comets are formed in deep space.

Borisov is only the second interstellar object spotted in our solar system 1210307

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Mandora, Western Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 55.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 48.3 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.