Earthquakes

Magnitude 5+ Earthquakes – Global

5.8 Earthquake hits Mozambique.

5.2 Earthquake hits Zambia.

5.2 Earthquake hits the Mid-Indian ridge.

5.1 Earthquake hits the Santa Cruz Islands.

5.0 Earthquake hits south of Fiji.

5.0 Earthquake hits the Kermedec Islands.

Storms and Floods

Tropical Storms – Roundup of Tropical Storms:

There are no current tropical storms,

NewsBytes:

China – More than 120 people were buried by a landslide that caused huge rocks and a mass of earth to come crashing into their homes in a mountain village in southwestern China early Saturday. The landslide, which came from a mountain, engulfed a cluster of 62 homes and a hotel in the village of Xinmo in Mao County at about 6 a.m. Officials said one mile of road and a 1.2 mile section of river were buried in the disaster caused by heavy rains.

Michigan, USA – Excessive rainfall overnight has flooded a swath across central Lower Michigan. The heaviest rain fell in an area from Mount Pleasant to Midland to the Bay City area where over 7 inches of rain were recorded.

Global Warming

Rising Temperature and Acidity Threaten Mediterranean

The temperature and acidity in the Mediterranean Sea are rising, and researchers are worried it will lead to extinction of native species.

Villefranche-sur-Mer oceanographic laboratory in the south of France released a study that said the ocean’s acidity has been rising on average of 7 percent a year between 2007 and 2015 and the water temperature rose 0.7 percent over the same period.

These rates are higher than any ocean in the world, researchers said.

National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) director of research, Jean-Pierre Gattuso said the change in temperatures and acidity has already changed the ecology of the ocean.

“There are species that come from the southern coasts of the Mediterranean, so we end up seeing a Mediterranean that is becoming almost subtropical,” he said.

And he’s worried that native species are going to die out, like the posidonia, a seagrass native to the Mediterranean that provides oxygen to fish.

Other species that could face extinction in the ocean are oysters, small molluscs, coral, and mussels.

Environment

The Gulf of Mexico’s ‘Dead Zone’

The oxygen-poor “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico may be the biggest on record this year, nearly doubling in size to cover an area of ocean as large as Vermont, scientists at Louisiana State University estimate.

The dead zone develops when nitrogen-rich runoff from the Midwestern farm belt pours into rivers and out into the Gulf. That runoff is loaded with fertilizer, as well as nutrients from animal and human waste, and it fuels the growth of algae that die, sink, and decompose, depleting oxygen levels offshore. That drives away marine life in the zone — or kills species that can’t escape.

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Wildlife

Arctic Migrants

An Inuvialuit hunter high in the Canadian Arctic came across the first beaver anyone in the region has ever killed — another sign climate change is driving the species northward.

“We saw something walk toward us and it was a beaver. So I drove up to it and I shot it,” said Richard Gruben, vice president of the Tuktoyaktuk Hunters and Trappers Association.

The invading beavers pose a significant threat to the Arctic ecosystem because of the way they reshape the landscape with dams. Gruben says some lakes have already dried up because of beaver dams.

Serengeti Invasion

Non-native plants that have been brought in by visitors or planted for decoration around tourist lodges threaten to spread across East Africa’s Serengeti-Mara landscape, where they could disrupt the annual migration of 2 million grazing animals.

A survey by an international team of researchers reveals that the invasive plants are now on the edges of the vast savannas, home to Africa’s famed wildebeest, zebra and gazelle populations.

The researchers say that if the plants were to spread and displace native vegetation, it would mean less forage for the wildlife.

Disease

Yemen: Cholera epidemic

After reporting more than 7,000 additional cholera cases in the past day, health officials report the case tally in the Yemen epidemic has reached 200,420 suspected cholera cases, including 1,310 deaths since Apr. 27.

First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitos found in Brazil

While more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers have identified a mosquito–caught in the Brazilian city of Aracaju–that’s naturally infected with the East-Central-South-African (ECSA) genotype of Chikungunya.

Chikungunya, which often causes a fever and joint pain, is endemic in Africa and Asia and was first reported to be transmitted within Brazil in 2014.