Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 44.0 degrees Celsius (111 degrees F) at Rivadavia, Salta, Argentina.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 51.0 degrees Celsius (-60 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 42.0 degrees Celsius (107 degrees F) at Rivadavia, Salta, Argentina.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 56.0 degrees Celsius (-69 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Leonid Meteor Shower

The annual Leonid meteor shower will peak this week as Earth passes through the trail of icy, rocky debris left behind nearly 30 years ago by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. On Thursday (Nov. 17) around 7 p.m. EST, Earth will swoop near a particularly dense patch of debris, resulting in sightings of about 15 meteors per hour. On Saturday (Nov. 19), stargazers may have another chance to see the Leonids, when Earth may pass through a stream of debris left by the comet more than 300 years ago.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 42.0 degrees Celsius (107 degrees F) at Wyndham, Western Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 58.0 degrees Celsius (-70 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 44.0 degrees Celsius (111 degrees F) at Rivadavia, Salta, Argentina.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 57.0 degrees Celsius (-70 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 43.0 degrees Celsius (109 degrees F) at Victoria River, Northern Territory, Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 63.0 degrees Celsius (-81 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 40.0 degrees Celsius (104 degrees F) at Tillaberi, Niger.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 70.0 degrees Celsius (-94 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 43.0 degrees Celsius (109 degrees F) at Skukuza, South Africa.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 69.0 degrees Celsius (-92 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 44.0 degrees Celsius (111 degrees F) at Kharga, Egypt.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 98.0 degrees Celsius (-144 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 46.0 degrees Celsius (114.8 degrees F) at Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 73.0 degrees Celsius (-99.4 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 46.0 degrees Celsius (114.8 degrees F) at Adrar, Algeria.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 74.0 degrees Celsius (-101.2 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 46.0 degrees Celsius (114.8 degrees F) at Al Qaysumah, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 74.0 degrees Celsius (-101.2 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 53.0 degrees Celsius (127.4 degrees F) at Death Valley. California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 75.0 degrees Celsius (-103.0 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 51.0 degrees Celsius (123.8 degrees F) at Death Valley. California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 78.0 degrees Celsius (-108.4 degrees F) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

How Many Meteorites Hit Earth

Every year, millions of rocky shards from outer space burn up in Earth’s atmosphere, many briefly flaring and appearing in the sky as “shooting stars.” But how many survive their high-speed plunges to strike the ground?

Giant impacts, such as the one that likely ended the reign of the dinosaurs about 66 million years ago, caused by an asteroid or comet measuring about 6 miles (10 kilometers) across, are extraordinarily rare. Instead, most rocks that fall to Earth are very small, and relatively few survive their fiery plummet through Earth’s atmosphere.

Scientists estimate that fewer than 10,000 meteorites collide into Earth’s land or water, which is a drop in the bucket compared with the moon, which doesn’t have an atmosphere and gets hit by varying sizes of space rocks: about 11 to 1,100 tons (10 to 1,000 metric tons) — the mass of about 5.5 cars — of space rock dust per day, and about 33,000 pingpong-ball-sized space rock collisions yearly, Live Science previously reported.