Storms and Floods

Tropical Storms – Roundup of Tropical Storms:

There are currently no tropical storm systems.

Newsbytes:

Italy – A wave of severe weather swept across Italy from 22 November 2022, including strong winds, high waves, storm surge and heavy rain. Emergency services carried out 2,500 interventions in 8 regions. Local media said the severe weather was brought by Storm Denise, which also affected the French island of Corsica. Many of the interventions were in response to damage caused by strong winds, including roofs ripped off buildings, and downed trees, branches and power lines. Vigili del Fuoco reported winds of more than 100 km/h in Trieste in Friuli Venezia Giulia Region. Stormy weather and roughs seas also affected areas in Sicily where ferry services were disrupted from the port at Milazzo.

Panama – Civil Protection authorities in Panama report that two people have died after heavy rain triggered a landslide in Colón Province. Meanwhile flooding continues to affect communities in Los Santos and Herrera Provinces where dozens of homes have been damaged. Heavy rain since the start of November has caused flooding and landslides in several provinces of the country. The rain is expected to continue until at least the end of the month.

Guyana – Torrential rain flooded large parts of Georgetown yesterday afternoon underlining the vulnerability of the capital to inundation in the context of climate change and a key pump went down after it came into a contact with a piece of wood. Although all other pumps and sluices were operable, the four inches of rain that drenched the capital left knee-high floods as kokers could not be opened due to the high tide.

Australia – Flooding in New South Wales continues with residents in Euabalong having been ordered to evacuate now as the Lachlan River rises toward a record peak. Moulamein residents are preparing to be isolated for weeks while Condobolin residents hope the worst of the crisis has passed.

Venice Flooding

Tourists know to beware of the ‘acqua alta’ in the fall and winter. The higher-than-normal high tides from the Adriatic Sea rush into the Venice Lagoon and over ancient squares, into ground floors and leave priceless monuments submerged. City leaders turned the tide and placed temporary glass barriers to protect the 900-year-old St. Mark’s Basilica.

A four-foot glass wall now surrounds the church to block priceless mosaics, marble, art, historical objects and crypts from the corrosive water. Engineers finished sinking the glass panels into the pavement to build the ring just in time for the November high tides. NASA scientists say that the Adriatic’s level is rising about 0.09 inches a year. Venice suffered only two high water events during the first half of the 20th Century, but recently, the city has been assaulted by 40 per decade. The city is also sinking. One study states that Venice sinks by 0.04 to 0.08 inches per year due to plate tectonics.

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